Monthly Archives: March 2016

Carnival of Souls

12108860_528825797289106_2811414094982697294_nAs directed by Herk Harvey, “Carnival of Souls” is a cult classic. A strange, atmospheric and unforgettable low-budget horror film that focuses on young church organist Mary Henry (Candace Hilligoss) who is haunted by visions of a ghoulish netherworld after surviving what appears to be certain death when a car in which she is a passenger, plunges over the edge of a bridge into the river below.

Amateurish in many ways (the film does include some stilted performances, bad lip-synching, clunky editing and a few continuity errors), “Carnival of Souls” nevertheless continues to exert a strange fascination for many viewers. Not a conventional horror or ghost story, “Carnival of Souls” explores the psychological state of Mary Henry after she emerges, apparently unharmed, from the murky depths of the river. Moreover, “Carnival of Souls” raises a number of perplexing questions that relate to the existence of Mary Henry, without providing any definitive answers. Has Mary really survived what appears to be certain death? Is she already dead? Does she exist in the real world or some parallel universe? One plausible interpretation of Carnival of Souls is that the film represents a hallucinatory dream –or nightmare– that Mary is experiencing in the split second before the car plunges into the river and she plummets to her death.

Significantly, Carnival of Souls was the only feature film to be directed by industrial and educational filmmaker Harold (Herk) Harvey. After completing “Carnival of Souls,” Harvey was to return to making industrial and educational films before retiring in the late 1980s (he died in 1996).

The initial inspiration for Carnival of Souls came when Harvey, while driving through Utah in 1961, spotted the ornate ruin of Saltair amusement park located on the arid shore of the Great Salt Lake. Dating from the 1920s, the massive carnival pavilion, with its imposing Eastern European turrets, had once housed a salt-water bath resort and then a carnival. However, changing times, shifting tastes, as well as a receding lake had put the resort out of business.  By the early 1960s, Saltair had become dilapidated and condemned, a crumbling landmark rising like a spectre outside Salt Lake City.

 Interviewed in 1989, Harvey remembered first seeing the old amusement pavilion, “It was sunset and I was driving to Kansas from California when I first saw Saltair. It’s an amusement park located at the end of a half-mile causeway out into the Great Salt Lake. The lake had receded and the pavilion with its Moorish towers stood silhouetted against the red sky. I felt I had been transported into a different time and dimension. I couldn’t believe what I was seeing. I stopped the car and walked out to the pavilion. The hair stood up on the back of my neck. The stark white of the salt beach and the strange dark quiet of the deserted buildings made it the spookiest location I had ever seen.” 

Harvey returned to Kansas and enlisted the services of his friend John Clifford, a co-worker and writer at Centron Films, to develop a script with the Saltair amusement park as the central premise. As Harvey later explained: “The last scene, I told him (Clifford), had to be a whole bunch of ghouls dancing in that ballroom; the rest was up to him. He wrote it in three weeks.” 

Streaming on MovieZoot.com: http://moviezoot.com/movies/carnival-of-souls/

How to Marry a Millionaire

11202578_431658560339164_2132403556351165392_nThere are several “inside” jokes in “How To Marry A Millionaire.” Among them, the fashion show sequence when Marilyn Monroe’s character, “Pola,” appears in a diamond-encrusted bathing suit and the mistress of the fashion house states that “diamonds are a girl’s best friend,” a reference to Monroe’s hit film Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. Pola’s complaint that “men aren’t attentive to girls who wear glasses” is a play on the famous Dorothy Parker quip “men don’t make passes at girls who wear glasses.”

While “Loco” Betty Grable) is in Maine with “Waldo,” they listen to the radio and she insists that the musician playing is Harry James, who in real life was married to Grable. When “Schatze” (Lauren Bacall) attempts to persuade “J. D.” that she prefers older men, she lists “that guy who was in The African Queen” as one of her crushes. The star of that film, Humphrey Bogart, was married to Bacall.

Other interesting tidbits: Background sequences for the film were shot in New York City and Sun Valley, ID. Fashion  designers Charles LeMaire and Travilla received  Academy Award nominations for Best Costume Design (Color) for their work on How to Marry a Millionaire. The film, which garnered excellent reviews, was a smash hit and grossed approximately $8 million dollars worldwide, a very big deal in the early 1950’s.

An item in an April 1954 issue of Variety  states that a New York City resident named Eveyln Paige filed a libel and invasion-of-privacy suit against Twentieth Century-Fox, because of similarities between the character of “Schatze Page” and herself. There is no record of the outcome of the suit.

How to Marry a Millionaire is the tale of three women bound and determined to wed rich men. There’s  resourceful Schatze Page (Lauren Bacall), spunky Loco Dempsey (Betty Grable), and ditzy Pola Debevoise (Marilyn Monroe) who rent a luxurious Sutton Place penthouse in New York City from seemingly wealthy Freddie Denmark (David Wayne), who is avoiding the IRS by living in Europe. The women plan to use the apartment as a man trap for millionaires and marry them.

When money grows tight, Schatze pawns some of Freddie’s furniture without his knowledge. To their dismay, as winter approaches, the furnishings continue to be sold off as they have no luck and find themselves in a drafty nearly-empty apartment.

One day, Loco carries groceries home, assisted by Tom Brookman (Cameron Mitchell). who is very interested in Schatze, but she dismisses him, thinking he is poor.  She tries repeatedly to brush him off as she sets her sights on the charming, classy widower J.D. Hanley (William Powell) whose worth is irreproachably large. All the while she’s stalking the older J.D., Tom, who is actually very wealthy, keeps after her. Following every one of their dates, Schatze tells him she never wants to see him again, refusing to marry a poor man again.

Meanwhile, Loco becomes acquainted with a grumpy businessman (Fred Clark). Although he’s married,she agrees to go to his lodge in Maine, mistakenly thinking she’s going to meet a bunch of Elks Club members. When they arrive, Loco is disappointed to find the businessman was hoping to have an affair with her in a dingy lodge instead of the glamorous surroundings  she was expecting. Loco attempts to leave but, unfortunately, comes down with the measles and has to stay put until cured.

She is nursed back to health with the help of strapping young Eben (Rory Calhoun), whom she thinks owns most of the surrounding land. She has no trouble transferring her affections to the handsome outdoorsman and they become engaged.Finding out he’s just a forest ranger, a disappointed Loco realizes she loves Eben and is willing to overlook his financial shortcomings.

Meanwhile Pola (Monroe)  is being romanced by a phony oil tycoon played by Alexander D’Arcy. Extremely nearsighted, she refuses to wear glasses where men might see her, living by the motto, “Men aren’t attentive to girls who wear glasses.” (a takeoff of Dorothy Parker’s “Men seldom make passes at girls who wear glasses.”) She falls for the  phony tycoon, not knowing he’s really a crooked speculator,  agreeing to go away with him.

 Luckily, Pola boards the wrong flight at New York’s LaGuardia Airport and winds up on the way to Kansas City having misread the sign for Atlantic City. Sitting next to a man—also wearing glasses—who thinks she’s “quite a strudel, ” she’s encouraged to wear her specs, too.

It turns out that he is the mysterious Freddie Denmark on his way to settle the score with the crooked accountant who got him into all that IRS trouble. He doesn’t have much luck with that but does better with love and he and Pola marry.

As bridesmaids, Loco, and Pola are reunited with Schatze just before her wedding to J.D. When she finds herself unable to go through with it and confesses  her love for Tom, he graciously understands and agrees to call off the wedding. Tom just happens to be a wedding guest so the two reconcile and marry, with Schatze still unaware that he’s rich.

How to Marry a Millionaire ends happily with the three  couples dining on hamburgers at a greasy spoon. Schatze jokingly asks Eben and Freddie about their financial prospects – which, to no one’s surprise –  are slim. When she finally gets around to Tom, he casually admits a net worth of  around $200 million and lists an array of holdings, which none of the others appear to take seriously. Calling for the check, Tom casually pulls out an enormous wad of cash and peels off a $1,000 bill,  telling the chef to keep the change. At that, the three astonished women faint dead away  as Tom and the men raise a toast to their unconscious wives.

Streaming for free on MovieZoot: http://moviezoot.com/movies/how-to-marry-a-millionaire/

 

Penny Serenade

12828984_526065304231822_2470349699581770488_oApplejack Carney pulls from a shelf an album of records entitled “The Story of a Happy Marriage” and places the song “You Were Meant for Me” on the Victrola. Julie Adams, Applejack’s old friend and owner of the album, asks him to turn off the tune and announces that she is leaving her husband Roger.

After glancing at the nursery, Julie restarts the song and remembers meeting Roger years earlier: The same ballad is playing over the loudspeakers at the San Francisco music store where Julie works. When the record begins to skip, passerby Roger Adams enters the store and meets Julie. The two begin to date, and while at the beach one day, Julie breaks open a fortune cookie, which reads “you will get your wish –a baby.” Roger, a confirmed bachelor who has no patience with children, hides his fortune, which predicts a “wedding soon,” and replaces it with “you will always be a bachelor.”

Roger, a reporter, changes his mind, however, when he bursts into a New Year’s Eve party with the news that his paper is assigning him to a post in Japan and asks Julie to marry him that evening. Knowing that they will not see each other for three months until Roger can earn enough money for Julie’s passage to Japan, the newlyweds kiss goodbye in Roger’s train compartment. As they embrace, the train pulls out, and as a result, Julie stays in Roger’s compartment until the train stops the next morning.

Three months later, when Julie is reunited with Roger in Japan, she reports that she is pregnant. Julie becomes concerned for the future of her family when she learns that Roger has lavishly furnished their house by spending advances on his salary. Later, when Roger inherits a small sum of money and announces that he has quit his job so that they can travel the world, Julie, disturbed by her husband’s financial irresponsibility, goes upstairs to pack. At that moment, a violent earthquake strikes, demolishing the house and causing Julie to lose the baby.

Roger and Julie return to San Francisco, and while hospitalized there, Julie learns that she will never be able to have children. Roger tries to console her by telling her that he wants to settle down and buy a small town paper, but Julie responds that a baby is all she ever wanted. Soon after, Roger buys the Rosalia Courier Press , and the couple moves into the apartment above the newspaper office, which is equipped with a small nursery. Roger hires their friend Applejack to manage the paper, but despite their hard work, circulation remains low.

Two years later, while Roger is working late one night, Applejack encourages Julie to adopt a child, and when Roger returns home, Applejack prods him into agreeing to consider adoption. When Julie writes to the orphanage to request a two-year-old boy with curly hair and blue eyes, Mrs. Oliver, the administrator, interviews the prospective parents and later pays a surprise visit to their home. At first disapproving because the Adams house is a cluttered mess, Mrs. Oliver is charmed by the little nursery and tells Julie that a five-week-old baby girl is available for adoption. When Julie and Roger protest that they wanted a two-year-old boy, the age their own baby would have been, Mrs. Oliver assures them that this is the child for them. Roger and Julie consent to see the infant, and when Julie falls in love with the baby, Mrs. Oliver allows them to take her home for a one-year probation period.

One year later, as the time for the adoption hearing approaches, Mrs. Oliver visits the family to update her records. When Julie admits that the paper has gone out of business and that Roger has no income, Mrs. Oliver solemnly caps her pen. Steeling themselves to return their baby, whom they have named Trina, to the orphanage, Roger bundles up the infant and proceeds to the judge’s chambers. When the judge denies the adoption, Roger, near tears, begs to keep the little girl, pleading that she is like his own child. Moved by Roger’s plea, the judge relents and grants the adoption, prompting Julie cheerily to proclaim that nothing can take Trina from them now.

Years pass, and Trina’s proud parents watch their daughter sing the echo to “Silent Night” in her school’s Christmas play. When Trina slips on a platform while onstage, she worries that she will not be allowed to play an angel in the play the following year.

The next Christmas, Mrs. Oliver receives a tragic letter from Julie, notifying her of Trina’s death after a sudden, brief illness. Julie confides that Roger is punishing himself for Trina’s fate and behaves like a stranger to her. At the Adams home, as Julie and Roger sit wordlessly in their living room, they hear a knock at the door. Julie answers it and finds a mother, frantic because her car is stalled and her son is due to perform in the school play. Julie and Roger offer to drive the mother and child to the play, and when the car arrives to the sound of children singing “Silent Night,” Roger gets out and proclaims that he never again wants to see anybody or anything that reminds him of Trina.

Julie’s thoughts return to the present, and she takes the record off the turntable just as Applejack climbs the stairs to deliver her train ticket. At that moment, Roger returns, despondent, but as he picks up Julie’s suitcase to drive her to the train station, the phone rings. It is Mrs. Oliver, calling to offer the couple a two-year-old boy, who is the image of the youngster they requested years earlier. Their faith and hope restored, Julie and Roger begin planning a new life with their son.

Applejack Carney pulls from a shelf an album of records entitled “The Story of a Happy Marriage” and places the song “You Were Meant for Me” on the Victrola. Julie Adams, Applejack’s old friend and owner of the album, asks him to turn off the tune and announces that she is leaving her husband Roger.

After glancing at the nursery, Julie restarts the song and remembers meeting Roger years earlier: The same ballad is playing over the loudspeakers at the San Francisco music store where Julie works. When the record begins to skip, passerby Roger Adams enters the store and meets Julie. The two begin to date, and while at the beach one day, Julie breaks open a fortune cookie, which reads “you will get your wish –a baby.” Roger, a confirmed bachelor who has no patience with children, hides his fortune, which predicts a “wedding soon,” and replaces it with “you will always be a bachelor.”

Roger, a reporter, changes his mind, however, when he bursts into a New Year’s Eve party with the news that his paper is assigning him to a post in Japan and asks Julie to marry him that evening. Knowing that they will not see each other for three months until Roger can earn enough money for Julie’s passage to Japan, the newlyweds kiss goodbye in Roger’s train compartment. As they embrace, the train pulls out, and as a result, Julie stays in Roger’s compartment until the train stops the next morning.

Three months later, when Julie is reunited with Roger in Japan, she reports that she is pregnant. Julie becomes concerned for the future of her family when she learns that Roger has lavishly furnished their house by spending advances on his salary. Later, when Roger inherits a small sum of money and announces that he has quit his job so that they can travel the world, Julie, disturbed by her husband’s financial irresponsibility, goes upstairs to pack. At that moment, a violent earthquake strikes, demolishing the house and causing Julie to lose the baby.

Roger and Julie return to San Francisco, and while hospitalized there, Julie learns that she will never be able to have children. Roger tries to console her by telling her that he wants to settle down and buy a small town paper, but Julie responds that a baby is all she ever wanted. Soon after, Roger buys the Rosalia Courier Press , and the couple moves into the apartment above the newspaper office, which is equipped with a small nursery. Roger hires their friend Applejack to manage the paper, but despite their hard work, circulation remains low.

Two years later, while Roger is working late one night, Applejack encourages Julie to adopt a child, and when Roger returns home, Applejack prods him into agreeing to consider adoption. When Julie writes to the orphanage to request a two-year-old boy with curly hair and blue eyes, Mrs. Oliver, the administrator, interviews the prospective parents and later pays a surprise visit to their home. At first disapproving because the Adams house is a cluttered mess, Mrs. Oliver is charmed by the little nursery and tells Julie that a five-week-old baby girl is available for adoption. When Julie and Roger protest that they wanted a two-year-old boy, the age their own baby would have been, Mrs. Oliver assures them that this is the child for them. Roger and Julie consent to see the infant, and when Julie falls in love with the baby, Mrs. Oliver allows them to take her home for a one-year probation period.

One year later, as the time for the adoption hearing approaches, Mrs. Oliver visits the family to update her records. When Julie admits that the paper has gone out of business and that Roger has no income, Mrs. Oliver solemnly caps her pen. Steeling themselves to return their baby, whom they have named Trina, to the orphanage, Roger bundles up the infant and proceeds to the judge’s chambers. When the judge denies the adoption, Roger, near tears, begs to keep the little girl, pleading that she is like his own child. Moved by Roger’s plea, the judge relents and grants the adoption, prompting Julie cheerily to proclaim that nothing can take Trina from them now.

Years pass, and Trina’s proud parents watch their daughter sing the echo to “Silent Night” in her school’s Christmas play. When Trina slips on a platform while onstage, she worries that she will not be allowed to play an angel in the play the following year.

The next Christmas, Mrs. Oliver receives a tragic letter from Julie, notifying her of Trina’s death after a sudden, brief illness. Julie confides that Roger is punishing himself for Trina’s fate and behaves like a stranger to her. At the Adams home, as Julie and Roger sit wordlessly in their living room, they hear a knock at the door. Julie answers it and finds a mother, frantic because her car is stalled and her son is due to perform in the school play. Julie and Roger offer to drive the mother and child to the play, and when the car arrives to the sound of children singing “Silent Night,” Roger gets out and proclaims that he never again wants to see anybody or anything that reminds him of Trina.

Julie’s thoughts return to the present, and she takes the record off the turntable just as Applejack climbs the stairs to deliver her train ticket. At that moment, Roger returns, despondent, but as he picks up Julie’s suitcase to drive her to the train station, the phone rings. It is Mrs. Oliver, calling to offer the couple a two-year-old boy, who is the image of the youngster they requested years earlier. Their faith and hope restored, Julie and Roger begin planning a new life with their son.

Streaming on MovieZoot.com: http://moviezoot.com/movies/penny-serenade/

Bus Stop

12697402_516653091839710_6826522936863091107_oIn the 1956 romantic comedy “Bus Stop,” a naive, rambunctious, overly enthusiastic and socially inept cowboy, Beauregard Decker, and his friend and father-figure Virgil Blessing take the bus from Timber Hill, Montana to Phoenix, Arizona, to participate in a rodeo. Virgil has encouraged the 21-year-old virgin, Beau, to take an interest in “girls.” Initially reluctant and frightened of the idea, Beau declares that he hopes to find an “angel” and will know her when he sees her. Making trouble everywhere they go, he continues his bad behavior in the Blue Dragon Café. There he imagines himself in love with the café’s singer, Chérie, a talentless but ambitious performer from the Ozarks with aspirations of becoming a Hollywood star. Her rendition of “That Old Black Magic” entrances him and he forces her outside, despite the establishment’s rules against it, kisses her and thinks that means they’re engaged. Chérie is physically attracted to him but resists his plans to take her back to Montana. She has no intention of marrying him and tells him so, but he’s too stubborn to listen.

The next day, Beau intends to marry Chérie after the rodeo, but she escapes. He tracks her down, and forces her on the bus back to Montana. On the way, they stop at Grace’s Diner, the same place the bus stopped on the way to Phoenix. Chérie tries to make another getaway while Beau is asleep on the bus, but the road ahead is blocked by snow and the bus won’t be leaving at all. They’re all stranded there. The bus driver, the waitress and the café owner by now all have learned that Beau is kidnapping and bullying the girl. Virgil and the bus driver fight him until he promises to apologize to Chérie and leave her alone. He, however, is unable to do so because he’s humiliated about having been beaten.

The next morning, the storm has cleared and everybody is free to go. Beau finally apologizes to Chérie for his abusive behavior and begs her forgiveness. He wishes her well and prepares to depart without her. Chérie approaches him and confesses that she’s had many boyfriends and is not the kind of woman he thinks she is. Beau confesses his lack of experience to her. Beau asks to kiss her goodbye and they share their first real kiss. All Chérie wanted from a man was respect, which she’d previously told the waitress when they sat together on the bus. This new Beau attracts Chérie. He accepts her past and this gesture touches her heart. She tells him she’ll go anywhere with him. Virgil decides to stay behind. When Beau tries to coerce him to go with them, Chérie reminds him that he can’t force Virgil to do what he wants. Having finally apparently learned his lesson, Beau offers Chérie his jacket and gallantly helps her onto the bus.

Streaming on MovieZoot.com: http://moviezoot.com/movies/bus-stop/

To Kill a Mockingbird

10-to-kill-a-mockingbird-mainThe film’s young protagonists, Jean Louise “Scout” Finch (Mary Badham) and her brother Jem (Phillip Alford), live in the fictional town of Maycomb, Alabama, during the 1930s. The story covers three years, during which Scout and Jem undergo changes in their lives. They begin as innocent children, who spend their days happily playing games with each other and spying on Arthur “Boo” Radley (Robert Duvall), who has not been seen for many years by anybody as a result of never leaving his house and about whom many rumors circulate. Their widowed father, Atticus (Gregory Peck), is a town lawyer and has a strong belief that all people are to be treated fairly, to turn the other cheek, and to stand for what you believe. He also allows his children to call him by his first name. Early in the film, the children see their father accept hickory nuts, and other produce, from Mr. Cunningham for legal work because the client has no money. Through their father’s work as a lawyer, Scout and Jem begin to learn of the racism and evil in their town, aggravated by poverty; they mature quickly as they are exposed to it.

The local judge appoints Atticus to defend a black man, Tom Robinson (Brock Peters), against an accusation of rape of a white teenaged girl, Mayella Ewell. Atticus accepts the case. Jem and Scout experience schoolyard taunts for their father’s decision. Later, a lynch mob, led by Mr. Cunningham, tries to lynch Robinson over Atticus’ objections. Scout, Jem and their friend, Dill, interrupt the confrontation. Scout, unaware of the mob’s purpose, recognizes Cunningham as the man who paid her father in hickory nuts and tells him to say hello to his son, who is her schoolmate. Cunningham becomes embarrassed and the mob disperses. It is undisputed that Tom came to Mayella’s home, at her request, to assist her with chopping up a chifforobe. It is also undisputed that Mayella showed signs of having been beaten around that time. Among Atticus’ chief arguments, he points out that Tom is crippled in his left arm, and that the supposed rapist would have had to make extensive use of his left hand in assaulting Mayella before raping her. At the same time Atticus demonstrates that Mayella’s father, Bob Ewell, is left handed, implying that he – rather than Tom – was the one who beat Mayella. Atticus also states that the girl had not even been examined by a doctor to check for signs of rape after the supposed assault. In his closing argument Atticus asks the all white, male jury to cast aside their prejudices and instead focus on Tom’s obvious innocence. In taking the stand in his own defense, Tom denies he attacked Mayella, but states she kissed him. He testifies he voluntarily assisted Mayella because he felt pity for her due to her circumstances. In a town where whites are viewed as superior to blacks, Tom’s sympathy for Mayella dooms his case, and he’s found guilty.

Atticus arrives home to discover from the sheriff that Tom has been killed by a deputy during his transfer to prison. The sheriff states that according to this deputy, Tom was trying to escape. The deputy reported that Tom ran like a “crazy” man before he was shot. Atticus and Jem go to the Robinson family home to advise them of Tom’s death. Bob Ewell, Mayella’s father, appears and spits in Atticus’ face while Jem waits in the car. Atticus wipes his face and leaves.

Autumn arrives and Scout and Jem attend an evening Halloween pageant at their school. Scout wears a ham costume, portraying one of Maycomb county’s products. At some point during the pageant, Scout’s dress and shoes are misplaced. She’s forced to walk home without shoes and wearing her ham costume. While cutting through the woods, Scout and Jem are attacked by an unidentified man who has been following them. Scout’s costume, like an awkward suit of armor, protects her from the attack but restricts her movement and severely restricts her vision. Their attacker is thwarted and overcome by another unidentified man. Jem is knocked unconscious and Scout escapes unharmed in a brief but violent struggle. Scout escapes her costume in time to see a man carrying Jem home. Scout follows and runs into the arms of a concerned Atticus. Doc Reynolds comes over and treats the broken arm of an unconscious Jem.

When Sheriff Tate asks Scout what happened, she notices Arthur “Boo” Radley standing behind the bedroom door in the corner of Jem’s room; Scout recognizes Boo as the person who came to their aid against Ewell in the woods. Boo is also apparently the man who carried Jem home. The sheriff reports Bob Ewell was discovered dead at the scene of the attack with a knife in his ribs. Atticus assumes Jem killed Ewell in self-defense. Sheriff Tate, however, believes that Boo killed Ewell in defense of the children and tells Atticus that to drag the shy and reserved Boo into the spotlight for his heroism would be “a sin.” To protect Boo, Sheriff Tate suggests the conclusion that Ewell “fell on his knife.” Scout draws a startlingly precocious analogy to an earlier lesson from the film (hence its title) when she likens any public outing of Boo to the killing of a mockingbird. The film ends with Scout considering events from Boo’s point of view, and Atticus watching over the unconscious Jem.

Streaming on MovieZoot.com: http://moviezoot.com/movies/to-kill-a-mockingbird/

A Star Is Born

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In the star-studded original 1937 version of the romantic drama, “A Star is Born,”  Janet Gaynor, Frederick March and Adolph Menjou tell the tale of a young actress (Janet Gaynor) who arrives in Hollywood with hopes of stardom. A chance encounter places her under the wing of older actor Norman Maine (Fredric March). Adopting the stage name Vicki Lester, she co-stars with Norman in a major motion picture entitled “The Enchanted Hour.” The film makes her an overnight success, even as viewers continue to lose interest in Norman. Norman proposes to Vicki; she accepts when he promises to give up drinking. After the couple wed, Vicki’s fame continues to grow, but Norman descends into alcoholism, and she must decide between pursuing her dream and caring for him.

A stay at a sanatorium seems to cure Norman’s increasingly disruptive alcoholism, but a chance encounter with Libby gives the press agent an opportunity to vent his long-concealed contempt and dislike for Norman. Norman resumes drinking. Esther decides to give up her career in order to devote herself to his rehabilitation. After Norman overhears her discussing her plan with Oliver, he drowns himself in the Pacific Ocean.

Shattered, Vicki decides to quit and go home. Soon afterward, her grandmother shows up once she hears Vicki is quitting. Her grandmother tells her of a letter Norman sent her when they got married. The letter stated how proud he was of Vicki, and how much he loved her. Because of her grandmother’s words, and the reminder of Norman’s deep love, Vicki is convinced to stay in show business. At the premiere of her next film at Grauman’s Chinese Theatre, Vicki is asked to say a few words into the microphone to her many fans listening across the world; she announces, “Hello everybody. This is Mrs. Norman Maine.”

“A Star is Born” is streaming on MovieZoot.com: http://moviezoot.com/movies/a-star-is-born/